Nigerians – walking the walk

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Its the beginning of a weekend so lets clebrate some of our own…

Chima Onoka has recently been appointed as the Country Representative in Nigeria for the IHP+Results team. IHP+Results provides an annual independent monitoring and evaluation review of the International Health Partnership (IHP+). This process of monitoring and evaluation was mandated by the IHP+ Global Compact and the subsequent high-level Ministerial Review in February 2009.  Chima says that this is an exciting time in Nigeria and the work could not have come at a better time as there is currently significant progress underway here to develop state and federal health plans, which together will be compiled to form a National Strategic Health Development Plan. This is all in line with Nigeria’s overall Development Plan (known here as 20 by 2020). This week bilateral and multilateral partners, including the IHP+ Global Compact signatories, are working on this together. In fact, a substantial IHP+ Harmonisation for Health (HHA) international team are here in Nigeria to support this whole process, including costing and a framework for monitoring and evaluation.
Find details here…

This year’s John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation’s genius grants awards included two well-known names in oncology: One of them is our own Olufunmilayo Funmi Olopade, MD, Professor of Medicine and Human Genetics and Director of the Center For Clinical Cancer Genetics at the University of Chicago Medical Center-whose research on individual and population cancer susceptibility has been translated into effective clinical practice for treating breast cancer among African and African-American women. Olopade is working to close the knowledge gap in several ways, including teaching pathologists and residents at Nigeria’s University of Ibadan, where she received her bachelor’s and medical degrees, how to properly screen for breast cancer. She’s also working with government and drug companies to get treatments to Africans. Finally, she’s sharing the results from the study, funded by the Breast Cancer Research Foundation and the National Women’s Cancer Research Alliance, with her peers worldwide, including at the Fifth International Conference on Cancer in Africa this November in Sénégal. Find details here…

Afam Onyema went to Stanford Law School intending to go the Big Law route. He summered at Kirkland & Ellis and got an offer from the firm. But by the time he entered his third year in 2006, Onyema’s plans had changed. He turned down the K&E offer and one from Paul, Hastings, Janofsky & Walker. Instead, he decided to open a hospital in Nigeria. In doing so, he was fulfilling his father’s dream. Onyema’s parents had moved from Nigeria to Chicago in 1974 so that his father, an obstetrician and gynecologist, could complete his residency at Cook County Hospital. His mother, a nurse, also finished her training in the United States.  Find details here…
……the most we can do in “re-branding” our country is to highlight the great work of its people. One day we hope to also be celebrating the success of Nigerian institutions….
http://www.nigeriahealthwatch.com/

Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed people can change the world; indeed it is the only thing that ever has…Margaret Mead

Chikwe Ihekweazu is an epidemiologist and consultant public health physician. He is the Editor of Nigeria Health Watch, and the Managing Partner of EpiAfric (www.epiafric.com), which provides expertise in public health research and advisory services, health communication and professional development. He previously held leadership roles at the South African National Institute for Communicable Diseases and the UK's Health Protection Agency. Chikwe has undertaken several short term consultancies for the World Health Organisation, mainly in response to major outbreaks. He is a TED Fellow and co-curator of TEDxEuston.

Discussion1 Comment

  1. “The quality and costing of plans, ongoing monitoring and evaluation as well as future political commitment are all key issues” does sound like the same old cliche ridden double speak we have heard before. What does it mean anyway? QA as the only way forward and our so called leaders are too daft to get any real work done? We simply expect to read about the future results rather than hear of more plans to do ABC. When is D going to show up since 1999?

    Nigerian Health Care Service in parallels as a way to award contracts that has yet to deliver measurable benefits? Perhaps my rant is the noise I wish to hear from Chima Onoka rather than his “this is an exciting time in Nigeria and the work could not have come at a better time as there is currently significant progress underway here to develop state and federal health plans, which together will be compiled to form a National Strategic Health Development Plan”.

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