A round-up of health news stories out of Nigeria


Following health news out of Nigeria is always interesting as one finds the good, bad and the simply absurd. Find here a cross section of recent stories.

“The sector, hitherto in a state of prostration, slumped into a coma with very severe untold consequences on the health of ordinary citizen’s especially sick infants and children, pregnant women and the bed ridden in the society.” Intimidating challenges facing the health care sector in Nigeria as resident doctors go on strike. Details in the Daily Independent.

“I want you to do three things for me. One, you should forgive me, secondly you should take care of our children and thirdly you should pray for me.” Read about how medical emergencies are dealt with at Mallam Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital in Sunday Trust.

“National Hospital has failed us – FCT Minister.” Well if that is the case with our National Hospital, what of the rest of the health care system? Details in Vanguard

“Government give prostitutes in Abuja 48hours to leave the city” If only life was as simple as that! Our new Minister for the FCT is throwing his weight around without doing the requisite thinking. In life and in what country has he heard that the oldest profession in the world has been eradicated by a ministerial ban? Come to your senses honourable minister! Details in the Daily Independent.

Finally – Lagos State Government has set July 1 for the full enforcement of road traffic laws and regulations guiding motorcycle taxi (Okada) operation, and it will be illegal from that date for school children, pregnant women, and women with babies strapped to their backs to use this mode of transport…again details in the Daily Independent
The new rule says “Nobody below 18 years should ride on motorcycle”


Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed people can change the world; indeed it is the only thing that ever has…Margaret Mead

Chikwe Ihekweazu is an epidemiologist and consultant public health physician. He is the Editor of Nigeria Health Watch, and the Managing Partner of EpiAfric (www.epiafric.com), which provides expertise in public health research and advisory services, health communication and professional development. He previously held leadership roles at the South African National Institute for Communicable Diseases and the UK's Health Protection Agency. Chikwe has undertaken several short term consultancies for the World Health Organisation, mainly in response to major outbreaks. He is a TED Fellow and co-curator of TEDxEuston.

Discussion1 Comment

  1. “it will be illegal from that date for school children, pregnant women, and women with babies strapped to their backs to use this mode of transport.” Another crazy government that has not provided alternatives to using death-trap-Okada. The social side of the system is not just repairing damaged bodies, it included a small detail. Prevention! How is small is that? Shame, our so called leaders are still fast asleep.

Leave A Reply